Teddy Feighan used to play bass in Driver Side Impact, the kind of band whose members practice coordinated stage moves and worry about getting their bangs to swoop properly. So it only figures that he would react against such manufactured showmanship now that he has escaped the teeny-bopper pop-punk scene.

Teddy Feighan used to play bass in Driver Side Impact, the kind of band whose members practice coordinated stage moves and worry about getting their bangs to swoop properly. So it only figures that he would react against such manufactured showmanship now that he has escaped the teeny-bopper pop-punk scene.

Frankly, though, when I first heard the mirage-like retro sample collages of Feighan's solo project Monster Rally, I wondered how he'd put together any stage show at all.

It's not like Feighan just presses play and stands there. Like Girl Talk's Gregg Gillis, Feighan uses sampling technology to re-splice his source material on the spot. The process demands a reasonable amount of concentration - all the more cause for concern considering how laid-back most of Monster Rally's songs are. At least Girl Talk is spazzy enough that Gillis can spend his time between cuts jumping around like a madman.

There would be no such antics last Thursday at Outland, where Monster Rally opened for Neon Indian and Asobi Seksu. The most activity on stage was when Feighan picked up a slightly out-of-tune guitar and played some melodies with his back to the audience. With Feighan huddled over his rig most of the time, the visual stimulation was left to a video collage projected behind him.

In a tough break for Feighan, the touring acts used up so many channels on the soundboard in the main performance room that he had to set up in Outland's gaudy front room instead. Because the lights were on the same circuit board as the overhead fans, the bar wouldn't let Feighan perform in darkness for fear of sweating out the audience.

The brightness dimmed Monster Rally's ambiance. Feighan's video was difficult to perceive, and his music's mysterious aura evaporated. Sonically it was divine - every bit the surrealist beach party I've come to expect - and the instrumentation, while fumbled, was a step in the right direction for a stage show that functions more like an art installation.

On the right night, in the right setting, Feighan's audiovisual endeavor could easily be a hypnotic and all-consuming experience. Unfortunately, to borrow a phrase from headliner Neon Indian, last Thursday's Monster Rally set was terminally chill.