Maybe it's the Girl Scouts. Armed with their trusty manuals, they wander through Elizabeth Leavitt's "Whales, Save Us!," asking the questions that need to be asked and giving the advice no one wants to hear.

Maybe it's the Girl Scouts. Armed with their trusty manuals, they wander through Elizabeth Leavitt's "Whales, Save Us!," asking the questions that need to be asked and giving the advice no one wants to hear.

Maybe it's Alvin Bigsby, a self-help guru whose words are always followed by exclamation points. He's gained wealth by rehabilitating the fallen, and he holds a strange belief that whales are the key to redemption.

Maybe it's Esme Delavoye, a washed-up child TV star who has earned the enmity of several people she trampled on her way up and is now re-encountering on her way down.

Whatever the reason, Raconteur Theatre Company's production of Leavitt's play tickles the brain and revels in plots of revenge. Director Mary-Aileen St. Cyr and her cast have captured the delicate absurdities of these characters.

As ZuZu Calistoga, a former child rodeo rider who had been betrayed by Esme, Rachel Mock alternates between pretend naivete and comic vengeance. Rudy Frias, who plays Del Peaquod, a photographer who lost his leg after pursuing Esme with his camera, alternates between apologizing excessively and dreaming of retribution.

Kristin Yarger gives Esme the touch of humanity that earned the character devoted followers when she was younger, as well as a large dose of the arrogance that won her many enemies. And Edwyn Williams' Alvin is always larger and louder than life itself.