Last week Republican presidential hopefuls gathered on CNN to engage in their party's second debate, and viewers were promised the debate would be unlike any other debate in the history of debates.

Last week Republican presidential hopefuls gathered on CNN to engage in their party's second debate, and viewers were promised the debate would be unlike any other debate in the history of debates.

This time they took questions from Twitter and Facebook. Those included: Elvis or Johnny Cash? "Dancing with the Stars" or "American Idol"? Coke or Pepsi? Blackberry or iPhone? Leno or Conan?

And here I thought we were trying to discern which candidate was best qualified to perhaps run America.

Are there any other #innovative, www.debate/damnannoyingtv.tvbieber before we move on?

"You'll see an electronic code on your screen. You can snap a picture of it and you'll get some exclusive access about our debates, some behind-the-scenes video and analysis," said moderator John King.

So King was suggesting while I'm watching this debate, I get out my phone and take a picture of the screen, launching a mobile-device internet browser to bring me to another screen filled with exclusive content deemed not good enough to put on your 24-hour, seven-day a week, why don't you text us to vote on what story you wanna see, lazy Susan of stupid?

Trivialities aside, it was time for the debate which began with each candidate glowingly speaking about their families and children. Michele Bachmann easily won the competition by giving birth to five children and inviting 28 foster children into her home. Take that, Ron Paul!

The only candidate to not mention his kids at all was Newt Gingrich, but he did challenge the others to a most wives contest. Consecutive, not concurrent - nice try, Mitt Romney.

Anyway, the baby-off was really just a proxy battle for the real battle - the pro-life-off - where each candidate proclaimed their love for "life."

My favorite magazine Life. My favorite board game Life. My favorite word to imagine a native of China stereotypically mispronouncing Rife.

The night's clear alpha candidate, Romney, whose distinguished "only my sideburns saw a ghost" hairdo allowed him the ability to moderate his position, like when he was asked about excluding Muslims from his Cabinet.

"I think we recognize that people of all faiths are welcome in this country. Our nation was founded on a principle of religious tolerance," Romney said.

Romney's response was terrific, but Newt Gingrich couldn't let him get away with that.

"The Pakistani who emigrated to the U.S., became a citizen and built a car bomb that luckily failed to go off in Times Square was asked by the federal judge how could he have done that when he swore an oath to the United States. He said, 'You're my enemy, I lied,'" Gingrich said. He added, "I'm in favor of saying to people if you're not prepared to be loyal to the United States, you will not serve in my administration."

So the point of that story was that people lie when they swear oaths of loyalty to the United States, and your solution is saying to these people, "Hey, don't do that."