For "Kidnapped," Spanish first-time filmmaker Miguel Angel Vivas follows some unusual technical rules to conjure a pretty straightforward nightmare.

For "Kidnapped," Spanish first-time filmmaker Miguel Angel Vivas follows some unusual technical rules to conjure a pretty straightforward nightmare.

The director tells a tale of home invasion in only 12 tightly choreographed, handheld camera shots. The first, a nail-biting prologue with a bound, terrified man, has no clear connection to the family at the center of the film, but it tints their introduction with dread.

As middle-aged couple Jaime (Fernando Cayo) and Marta (Ana Wagener) and their teenage daughter Isa (Manuela Velles) move into a new home, the eyes go nervously to its huge windows. Later that evening, one comes crashing in at the hands of a trio of ski-masked men looking for cash.

At first, Vivas uses the disembodied, perfectly pitched shrieks of his actresses to ratchet the tension. Eventually, however, things get visibly ugly as unexpected visitors show up and the women try to escape their captors.

In its content and fatalistic tone, "Kidnapped" owes a lot to Michael Haneke's "Funny Games." But unlike Haneke, Vivas doesn't want to indict you as an accomplice - he wants to terrorize you as a victim. It's an approach that's not as thoughtful, and certainly not for everyone, but it's effectively intense nonetheless.