Sculpture artists David Bamber and Andrew F. Scott became fast friends during graduate school at Ohio State. They discussed art's form and function and thoughtfully critiqued one another.

Sculpture artists David Bamber and Andrew F. Scott became fast friends during graduate school at Ohio State. They discussed art's form and function and thoughtfully critiqued one another.

That was in 1986. A year later, the two set up a shared workspace. They remained studio mates for the next 18 years, before Scott left to teach at the Savannah College of Art and Design. Bamber even asked Scott to be the godfather of his first child.

Although they worked side by side and jointly created public work (such as the Dublin Community Recreation Center's interior relief sculpture series) the upcoming gallery show "Re-Union" is the first time the two have exhibited their individual art together.

Intellectual fraternizing in a shared space is not uncommon in the art world, Scott said. It's part of what has made movements tick, historically speaking. Consider Andy Warhol's Factory or the meet-ups of members of the Ashcan School.

Bamber and Scott have influenced each other throughout their time together, Scott said, despite their differences.

Bamber constructs sculptures that honor the material being used, which is often steel. He doesn't typically paint the works or contrive color schemes. Recently he started making sculptures on a smaller scale that study the atrophying of industrial-era machines.

Scott gets great inspiration from the tradition of African art. He often employs a computer as a tool, such as when he digitally drafts a design and engraves it into a sculpture using a laser. His materials have included cardboard, bronze, steel, fluorescent lights and glass.

"David is a consummate craftsman," Scott said. "A lot of what I learn from him is about craft. How to craft. How to use steel. How to put metals together."

And as for what Bamber has learned from him?

"I tend to work somewhat faster and more deliberately," Scott said. "Neither's better. Just different styles When he showed me pieces from his new series, I said I wanted to see the eighth or 10th piece. I think he took that as a challenge to really begin to explore that theme at a quicker rate."