Even the kids who hate reading books in school are usually enthralled by Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird." The 1960 novel opened - and continues to open - many people's eyes to the injustice caused by racism in the South.

Even the kids who hate reading books in school are usually enthralled by Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird." The 1960 novel opened - and continues to open - many people's eyes to the injustice caused by racism in the South.

In the 1962 movie version, lovable little Scout is preoccupied by learning about Boo Radley, her mysterious hermit neighbor, and all seems to be fine in the world. Then her father, widowed lawyer Atticus Finch (officially the coolest film hero in history, according to the American Film Institute), decides to defend a black man who's accused of raping a white woman.

The unjust treatment received by both Tom Robinson, the defendant, and Scout's family makes the little girl realize that the world is nowhere near perfect.

It may not be the most uplifting tale, but "Mockingbird" is a cinematic treasure worth catching on the Ohio Theatre's big screen.