The slipperiness of language is something Dina Sherman treats like a slide on a kids' jungle gym. It's an area for play, for running loose and getting the blood and mind flowing. With cohorts Ryan Williams and Sarah Blyth-Stephens, she puns her way through works in various media in the exhibition "Nothing is Very Complicated" at OSU's Urban Arts Space.

The slipperiness of language is something Dina Sherman treats like a slide on a kids' jungle gym. It's an area for play, for running loose and getting the blood and mind flowing. With cohorts Ryan Williams and Sarah Blyth-Stephens, she puns her way through works in various media in the exhibition "Nothing is Very Complicated" at OSU's Urban Arts Space.

The artist's wordplay is most ordered in pieces such as "over extension," in which the title's words are rendered in pinprick holes on separate pieces of paper, and connected by a valance-like drape of thread that runs back and forth through the letters. The line Sherman cites as her favorite in the exhibit, the titular "nothing is very complicated," is spelled out on a white wall with easy-to-miss white vinyl letters.

With Williams, Sherman engaged in a collaborative trade, sometimes giving him a drawing that needed text and other times receiving a word or phrase that needed illustrating. The exchange guided a series of drawings that often feature fantastical creatures inspired by mythology or elements of co-opted wildlife imagery.

These works present a more subtle form of play, in which words are "a convoluted entry point for interpreting the image," Williams explained.

"It's an attempt at channeling something from within the image or text without being obvious," he said. "It's not supposed to be a narrative, more like a visual poem."

Between the cryptic word streams they present, the pretty handwriting that spells them out and Sherman's delicately lined, humorously odd imagery, the drawings make an altogether fun invitation into the world of conceptual art.

Just as entertaining - or maybe even more so - is Sherman's collaboration with Blyth-Stephens, the video "Understanding Wittgenstein." Monitors present a muted Stephens slowly reading writings from the philosopher beside video and audio of Sherman trying to lip-read Stephens' words, turning deep thoughts on the function and meaning of language into hilarious, monosyllabic gibberish.