Since putting an exclamation point on their ubiquitous 2010 by headlining the Newport last January, The L.E.S. Crew has been laying low, incubating a new lineup of musicians and new material to go with it. This weekend, the live hip-hop band begins a string of shows that highlights just how versatile their "Living Energy System" can be.

Since putting an exclamation point on their ubiquitous 2010 by headlining the Newport last January, The L.E.S. Crew has been laying low, incubating a new lineup of musicians and new material to go with it. This weekend, the live hip-hop band begins a string of shows that highlights just how versatile their "Living Energy System" can be.

Friday, L.E.S. will play with folk and indie-rock bands. A dozen days later, they'll perform alongside rappers. Next month, they're doing a show with jam-friendly funk and soul bands. Such a diverse slate of contemporaries exemplifies the "all is one" philosophy the group has been pushing since forming in 2006.

"Involuntarily we've been positioning ourselves to try to work with any and everybody because that kind of represents what we stand for," L.E.S. rapper Eric Rollin said.

The resurgence begins Friday at Kobo, where L.E.S. will mingle with The Spruce Campbells, Trains Across the Sea and Two Cow Garage's Shane Sweeney to help launch the second volume of photographer Meghan Ralston's local music book "The Hot 17."

Other than a short-lived weekly gig at Ravari Room in February, most of L.E.S. Crew's activity this year has been hashing out new tunes and developing chemistry with brothers Juhriah and Jahrie Smith (also of Chicken Hawk Bird Getters) on guitar and drums respectively, plus new percussionist Joey Gurwin. They recently kicked off recording sessions for the follow-up to last year's "Vol. 1" at Oranjudio.

As usual, Rollin and his fellow lyricists have been aiming to energize and inspire.

"It's something that's positive," Rollin said, "something that I can give somebody my age who listens to the Top-40 hip-hop hits and they'll like it, and I could take it into my church and give it to my pastor and he'll like it - something real but also universal."