The new exhibition at Sherrie Gallerie comes with a special set of viewing instructions: Step right up to the old-fashioned camera box, look in the peep hole, (carefully!) crank the handle and watch the show.

The new exhibition at Sherrie Gallerie comes with a special set of viewing instructions: Step right up to the old-fashioned camera box, look in the peep hole, (carefully!) crank the handle and watch the show.

This weekend the gallery debuts these interactive sculptures dubbed "Vista Internas" by local artist Hiroshi Hayakawa. Inside the early-1900s cameras, Hayakawa created miniature kinetic scenes. After the antique engine is cranked, the scenes perform a series of motions, like the hand and the red marble-like balls moving around in "Vista Interna #5."

The act of winding up and peering into the sculptures calls into question the deliberate act of voyeurism and what it means to view things from the outside in.

The show marks a significant evolution for Hayakawa, who is a photography and drawing instructor at CCAD. His previous work focused on the nude female form, photographed and transferred through liquid emulsion onto steel plates.

"It's really fascinating," said gallery owner Sherrie Hawk of the "Vista Internas" series. "I'm very excited to see an artist grow and change like this."


Rivet

The three illustrators showing at Rivet often tell their tales through drawings of females.

Minnesota-based Wood uses splashes of ink, watercolor, tea or Diet Coke to create an asymmetrical Rorschach-drip backdrop for her drawings of girls discovering, doing or fighting something that's not completely visible. Some of her work includes chopped-up pages of writing; the sentence or thought is indecipherable, leaving viewers to piece together their own ending to the story.

The women in Bec Winnel's work exude a slaying beauty. The Aussie artist concocts her cotton-candy-soft palette by layering colored pencil, acrylic and aerosol paints, white chinagraph and makeup. The realistic ladies are at once welcoming but sullen, obvious but enigmatic.

Jonas Lofgren draws tough girls with graphite pencil and watercolor, endearing viewers to their strange youthful angst. The intricate world the German artist creates is like a gothic Neverland, and these are its Lost Girls.


The Sharon Weiss Gallery

Malcolm Baroway was in charge of public relations at Ohio State and "realized that when I retired, I would need something to keep me busy," Baroway said. He took up painting and has turned his hobby into a second career.

This month his paintings, inspired by the masters, will be on view here, including "The Conversation," recent winner of the Pizzuti Award for Best in Show at the Ohio Art League's anniversary exhibition.