Already had sunburn this summer? Ouch. Read on for tips on soothing the burn and how to ward off long-term effects.

Already had sunburn this summer? Ouch. Read on for tips on soothing the burn and how to ward off long-term effects.

Quick relief

Even mild sunburn can be downright uncomfortable. Thankfully, you can get relief in a way that's the total opposite: a bath.

Put about 2 cups of uncooked oatmeal, 1 cup of milk and one or two spoonfuls of honey into a warm bath. According to this BellaSugar.com recipe, these common cooking ingredients together will soothe the skin, infuse vitamins and restore moisture. Soak in this stew as long as you'd like.

What to buy

The easiest (and cheapest) way to heal sensitive sunburn is to apply a thin layer of Vaseline, dermatologist Dr. Michael Chen said. Keeping the area moist is key. If your burn is redder than you'd like, a dermatologist can prescribe ointments to help things heal even more quickly.

Chen, of Skin Cancer & Dermatology of Columbus on the Northwest Side, advises against lotions sold for sunburn relief.

"What you don't want to do is put a bunch of gimmicky things that have a bunch of chemicals on your open skin," he said, but added that aloe-based products are beneficial.

Fix the effects

Bathing beauties might not consider it when they're in their prime, but sun exposure can accelerate the aging process. To ward off more fine lines, wrinkles and sun spots, Dr. James McMahan offers the Fraxel Laser treatment. The laser is typically used on the face, neck and hands, and it takes a few days to recover afterward.

McMahan has offered the procedure for about 3 1/2 years at Advanced Aesthetic & Laser Surgery on the Northwest Side. The ideal candidate is "the person who's had sun damage, they're starting to get some fine lines, they're starting to get some sun spots, but they're not really sagging yet," he said, adding that such a person will usually see results in three or four monthly treatments.

Visit the doc

Everyone should be checked by a dermatologist annually - and if you notice a weird mole, go right away, said Dr. Chen of Skin Cancer & Dermatology of Columbus.

For the unfamiliar, a screening is basically a quick once-over in which the doctor examines your skin for irregularities. The difference between catching a problem sooner rather than later is stark - survival rates drops dramatically, Chen said.

So get checked.