If you've never worked for anyone who reminds you of the awful employers of "Horrible Bosses," consider yourself lucky.

If you've never worked for anyone who reminds you of the awful employers of "Horrible Bosses," consider yourself lucky.

The rest of us can nod knowingly in between fits of laughter - as long as you don't mind your comedies as black and bitter as the office coffee.

Three friends share one problem. Nick (Jason Bateman) works long hours for a tyrannical boss (Kevin Spacey), reaching for the dangled carrot of job promotion.

Kurt (Jason Sudeikis) actually loves his job at a chemical company, until his boss' cokehead son (Colin Farrell) takes the reins.

Dale (Charlie Day) is a dental assistant who is relentlessly sexually harassed by his boss (Jennifer Aniston), despite his recent engagement.

Leaving a job in this economy? That's not an option. So the trio turns to Plan B, murdering one another's bosses.

"Bosses" hits some of the same notes as the modern classic of workplace angst, "Office Space," but as it gets darker and darker, "Very Bad Things" might be a better comparison.

Director Seth Gordon works from a punchy script that goes low-brow without the usual gags and actually works in some darkly funny plot twists.

Gordon also finds a nice balance for his three leads. Bateman, Sudeikis and Day have all typically been funny in supporting roles. I'm not sure which of them is really ready to carry a comedy, but as a team, they're dynamite.

Aniston mostly gets cheap laughs by playing against her sweetheart image, but Spacey is perfectly easy to hate, making the black comedy go down easier.

In a hit-and-miss summer for comedies, I'd put it behind "Bridesmaids" but easily ahead of "The Hangover Part II" and "Bad Teacher." It's a good way to blow off that workplace steam.