Just before the smitten Olivia (Emily Bach) confesses her love for Viola (Ashley Anne Henderson), who is disguised as a man named Cesario, Viola tries to take her leave with the line, "Then westward-ho."

Just before the smitten Olivia (Emily Bach) confesses her love for Viola (Ashley Anne Henderson), who is disguised as a man named Cesario, Viola tries to take her leave with the line, "Then westward-ho."

It appears that from that phrase director Tim Browning conceived a Wild West setting for the New Players Theater Festival's production of "Twelfth Night." Shakespeare didn't let geographical improbabilities get in his way, so why should a shipwreck in the Wild West trouble anyone?

But there is an imbalance in Browning's adaptation. The foolish secondary characters - Ken Erney's Sir Toby Belch, Jim Azelvandre's Sir Andrew Aguecheek and Danielle Mann's Maria - relish the torment they serve Matt Hermes' Malvolio, but they get an inordinate amount of attention and overshadow the main event.

The interactions between Henderson and Joe Lusher's Duke Orsino, in particular, seem shortchanged.

Henderson's deep, somewhat gravelly voice adds believability to her passing for a man. Bach makes a convincing transition from stern denier of Orsino to besotted admirer of Cesario. And as the clown and "corrupter of words" Feste, David Tull takes advantage of every insult, pun and punch line that Shakespeare deals him.

New Players' "Twelfth Night" (July 7-8 and 14-17) is running in repertory with "Romeo and Juliet" (July 9-10) under the evening sky at Mill Run.