If you're planning to visit Franklin Park Conservatory this weekend, you'll find plants in bloom, koi in the Pacific Island Water Garden and green thumbs working garden plots.

If you're planning to visit Franklin Park Conservatory this weekend, you'll find plants in bloom, koi in the Pacific Island Water Garden and green thumbs working garden plots.

Not much will be different. Well, except the name.

On July 19, the Near East Side horticulture center was officially renamed the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens as part of a new branding campaign designed to highlight its diverse offerings.

Released alongside the fresh handle is a new logo that merges man and plant - a signal of the organization's continued growth and expansion.

"This new campaign is about what the conservatory is and all that it offers," Executive Director Bruce Harkey said. "We wanted a logo that can live for a long time."

It's the latest look for a space that has changed monumentally during the past 160 years.

In 1852, Franklin Park's 88 acres were set aside to host the Franklin County Fair. A glass structure was completed in 1895, and the grounds later were chosen as the site of AmeriFlora '92, an international horticultural expo.

Today the conservatory's indoor and outdoor spaces host everything from plant exhibits to cooking classes, glass-blowing demos to butterfly releases.

The new branding campaign also comes as the conservatory celebrates the completion of phase one of its master plan, Harkey explained.

Developed in 2000 with extensive community input, the project included additions and improvements to the Palm House, installation of the sprawling Community Garden Campus and construction of a new 9,200-square-foot support greenhouse for increased horticultural needs.

The conservatory will celebrate its new look and the phase one achievements with a public ceremony starting at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 8.

Guests are welcome to bring picnic meals, enjoy food prepared by the conservatory and sip from a cash bar. The ProMusica Chamber Orchestra will perform beneath the Palm House's light installation.

"We're about connecting people with people and people with nature," Harkey added.