The most democratic of temporary stages, soapboxes have been used for centuries to educate the public through the simple force of elevated height and a raised voice. Although soapboxes are mostly associated with politicizing, Periodisa Publishing staff and writers are stepping up to promote local short fiction and poetry at the Soapbox Saturday Read-In, happening throughout the Short North.

The most democratic of temporary stages, soapboxes have been used for centuries to educate the public through the simple force of elevated height and a raised voice. Although soapboxes are mostly associated with politicizing, Periodisa Publishing staff and writers are stepping up to promote local short fiction and poetry at the Soapbox Saturday Read-In, happening throughout the Short North.

"We love the idea of recreating an image of a time when people brought their politics, their arts, and their thoughts and words - their passion - to the street," explained Periodisa owner and editor Lori Gum.

Gum will be selling issues of the first two volumes of Filigree, Periodisa's bi-monthly literary compilation, out of the back of her truck, while managing editor Tyler Hively joins contributors and a few game supporters to read on the neighborhood's street corners.

They'll offer selections from the previously published Filigree editions, as well as a third volume coming out Aug. 5 (Fringe Outfitters will host the release party). Participants include writers Matthew Schnabel, Karin Davidson and Joshua Gandee, poet Pete Stroup and photographer Justin Luna.

Asked what passers-by can expect, Hively said, "They're going to get hit in the face with literature, which I don't think happens a lot in Columbus."

Filigree has published the work of more than 20 local writers and artists to date, each possessing a creative voice that Hively describes as "younger and less academic than you'd find in literary journals. More blunt, not sugar-coated."

So far Periodisa has found a healthy audience for Filigree. As much as Gum and Hively hope to further build public awareness of their efforts with Soapbox Saturday, they're just as concentrated on luring writers with the event.

"Outside of an academic situation, there's really not a writing peer community. Writing is so isolating, it's hard to form a community. We're trying to change that," Gum said.

"We also hope that further exposure will encourage local writers who may not know about us to submit their work.That is as important to us as selling the magazine.We have no magazine without them."