As co-owner of the home goods resale store ReUse It, Michael Osborne knows the many benefits of the buy-here-sell-here business.

As co-owner of the home goods resale store ReUse It, Michael Osborne knows the many benefits of the buy-here-sell-here business.

"You can buy something that's used and make it your own," said Osborne, whose store is located on the south end of Lennox Town Center on Chambers Road. "And it's a green business. We give new life to old stuff."

But what about when you want to benefit from resale stores beyond just shopping them? Whether the goal is cash or store credit, take a few moments for the following and maximize your stuff's earning potential.

Home goods

Clean everything.

"If it's dirty with food, we're going to give you less money," Osborne said. "If it's covered in pet hair you'll probably get less money for it."

Call ahead to see what the resale shop particularly needs. At ReUse It, "we sell a lot of stuff like can openers, TVs, chests of drawers," Osborne said. "Practical stuff that people need."

Avoid overwhelming the staff. The value of individual items can get lost amid big loads. "The more you bring in, of course, the more money you'll get," Osborne said, "but don't bring an entire apartment in at once."

Technology

The closer you can get to the original packaging, the better.

"If you have the original receipt, the original box, bring those," said Lyndsey Archer, marketing specialist at OUAC Inc., the company that owns electronics resale shop GadgetEase. "It's going to sell for a little bit more if it comes in a box rather than if it's just a unit."

Bring all the cords and remotes that came with the technology, wipe all internet history, erase GPS "home" locations and delete personal information from iPods. Digitally cleaning and charging gadgets saves the store time between purchase and sale, increasing the item's value.

Clothing

Do your research. A bigger return is waiting for those designer jeans at a resale store that values labels than at a store that doesn't care as much about brands. Ask the store whether they'd prefer a season's clothes sold during that season or before it begins. Consider each store's shopper demographics to decide what to try to sell where.

Stores aren't looking for garment bags, but pressing and folding make clothes look better as they inspect them.

"It takes 10 minutes to clean up your item," said Archer, whose company also owns resale stores Plato's Closet and Clothes Mentor. "That's going to greatly increase the amount of money you're going get for it."