You love. You live. You die. Art inspired by this trinity of human experience is on view at MadLab's latest gallery exhibit.

You love. You live. You die. Art inspired by this trinity of human experience is on view at MadLab's latest gallery exhibit.

"Love, Life and Death" features 34 photographs, paintings and illustrations by 18 artists. The show is visual evidence that though the surfaces of those themes are the same, everyone experiences and interprets them differently. From concept to style, each story is told uniquely.

"We didn't put a very strict rein on the artists in our call for entry," said Peter Graybeal, a MadLab actor and director in charge of the theater's gallery space in its lobby. "We simply asked 'Whatever it means to you' and received quite a variety of themes and mediums."

Artist Denver Black presents a disturbing depiction of life's unfairness and potential for unthinkable cruelty. The stare of an African-American boy catches viewers in Black's photo collage called "Waging a White War." The boy's image is surrounded by black and white photos of lynched and starving men and hooded KKK members.

But tenderness is there, too. Rachel Bodnar's series of three photographs spurs appreciation for fleeting moments. The first photo, "Life," is of the feet of a baby; the second, "Love," is of the entwined legs of lovers in bed; and the third, "Death," is of the tagged toes on a body in a morgue.

One can get lost searching for meaning in the abstract paintings by Arlo Moon and Tom Kelly, a particularly fitting feeling considering the mystery of the exhibit's title subjects.

Viewers will find references to mythology and spirituality. Carrie "Butterfly" Turner's illustration of a small beaming eggshell in the dirty forgotten debris of a sidewalk is called "The Second Coming," and Heather "Squish" Cornelius' textured painting "He Watches" shows a raven waiting ominously on a rooftop, representing the legend that the bird takes the soul after death. The work is a reminder that part of life is the mystery of dying.

The gallery is open by appointment or an hour before each MadLab performance. A production of "The Greatest Play Ever Written in the History of the World Ever" is showing at 8 p.m. July 29-30 and Aug. 5-6.