"Crazy, Stupid, Love" brings together the writer of Pixar's "Cars" and the directors of last year's outlandish gay romp "I Love You Phillip Morris." Together they find a pleasant place for viewers between tired romantic comedies and indie films with quirky families.

"Crazy, Stupid, Love" brings together the writer of Pixar's "Cars" and the directors of last year's outlandish gay romp "I Love You Phillip Morris." Together they find a pleasant place for viewers between tired romantic comedies and indie films with quirky families.

Heading the family is Cal Weaver (Steve Carell) and his wife, Emily (Julianne Moore), who begins the film by asking for a divorce and admitting to infidelity with a co-worker (Kevin Bacon).

Cast off into a beige bachelor apartment and a local pick-up bar, angry, style-deficient Cal is taken under the wing of Ryan Gosling's Jacob, a ladies' man's ladies' man. But soon, Jacob's seeking Cal's advice on how to proceed with a woman (Emma Stone) who's touched the heart within his perfectly chiseled torso.

Add in Cal's enduring love for Emily, his growing success with (and trail of) women, his son's crush on his 17-year-old babysitter and her secret longing for Cal, and you've got the fixings for a big pile of wacky misunderstandings.

This threatens to derail the film, but it plows ahead on the strength of the cast - Gosling is surprisingly loose, and the other leads feel equally natural - and some genuinely clever dialogue. On the other hand, some of it is stupid, but this is almost always intentional. And it's nice of the filmmakers to put a warning in the title.