It is almost statistically impossible that you will like "Page One: Inside The New York Times" as much as I do.

It is almost statistically impossible that you will like "Page One: Inside The New York Times" as much as I do.

I'm a former newspaper addict turned web convert, as well as a film critic with a longtime love of fly-on-the-wall documentaries.

I'm the intersection point in the Venn diagram of this doc's appeal, but most anyone with interest in a shifting media landscape will enjoy this look.

Filmed over a year and with unprecedented access, the movie documents The New York Times in a period of transition. Against a bleak financial backdrop, journalists at the paper struggle to maintain the high standards of the Gray Lady.

The biggest knock on "Page One"? It can be unfocused, hitting several issues worthy of their own docs.

Wikileaks is juxtaposed against newspapers' roles in Watergate and the release of the Pentagon Papers. As old ad revenues dry up, will the advent of the iPad and the Times' now-famous website paywall save the day?

And then there's David Carr, a salty old-school reporter who is the unabashed star of the documentary. Watching him dress down the newcomers on media panels is a delight, as is the fact that journalists like Carr still exist.

The flaws are few, and the inside look at the dying giant is enthralling. News hounds, don't miss it.