Some musicians go through band names like baby clothes, keeping up with stylistic growth and development by trading in each discarded moniker for something that fits better. Carlos Avendano is not one of those musicians.

Some musicians go through band names like baby clothes, keeping up with stylistic growth and development by trading in each discarded moniker for something that fits better. Carlos Avendano is not one of those musicians.

Avendano's band, Flotation Walls, has been going strong in one form or another for 15 years. The name has seen him through teenage noise experiments and collegiate goofball rock and the grandiose art-rock he currently trades in. Many, many members have come and gone.

Along the way, the only constants have been Avendano himself and the yellow uniforms that have always made Flotation Walls one of the most visually stimulating rock bands in Columbus. Back when they released the long-gestating "Nature" LP in 2009, drummer Luke Brevoort explained the visual appeal thusly:

"If you're at a bar and there's a guy in a yellow suit screaming 'The sky ejaculates!' at you, whether or not that's a way to start a conversation, in terms of making a personal connection with someone, it's a really hard handshake."

That grip remained tight Friday at Carabar. The yellow suits are striking, but Flotation Walls would stand out even without their unusual attire. Few bands in Columbus aim to make music this ambitious, and even fewer pull it off.

They played to celebrate the release of a new digital single called "Obelisk" and B-side "Alum & Lye," their first public recordings since "Nature." The new joints, which bookended Friday's set, continued to navigate the orchestral psychedelic expanse that birthed "Nature." Both built from intimate guitar-and-vocal paeans into emotionally volatile soundscapes, with choral swells capped off by Avendano's agonized shouts.

It's all cinematic in the same way The Flaming Lips and Arcade Fire are cinematic, the sound of hopes and dreams broadcast in widescreen. The latest lineup finds Flotation Walls more capable of pulling off such a spectacle, having shed multi-instrumentalist Ryan Stolte-Sawa but added three players in her wake.

Incorporating trumpets, fancy percussion and whatnot in a bar could come off highly pretentious. (So could yellow suits, for that matter.) But there's a playful spirit amidst all the "serious" music at Flotation Walls shows. More importantly, the music is emphatic and lovely enough to justify such pomp and circumstance.