What began as a simple story in the News of the World phone-hacking scandal -Ma and Pa Newspaper hacking into a murdered little girl's phone and paying the police to cover it up - has unfortunately turned ugly.

What began as a simple story in the News of the World phone-hacking scandal -Ma and Pa Newspaper hacking into a murdered little girl's phone and paying the police to cover it up - has unfortunately turned ugly.

Things have just gotten worse for the newspaper overseen by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.

Last week, London's two top policemen at Scotland Yard resigned. Authorities arrested Rebekah Brooks, the woman who ran News of the World during the worst of, as the British call them, "the troubles."

Honestly, it was hard to imagine this story getting more out of control. Then, Sean Hoare, the reporter who first alleged widespread hacking at the paper was found dead in his home.

Ruh-roh, Raggy. Did he die of natural causes?

I thought Scotland Yard would be all over this case, investigating any possible connection to the scandal, but they quickly said the death is not considered suspicious.

Well, I guess if the guys who were bribed don't think there's anything suspicious in the death of the guy who blew the whistle on the company providing the bribes, I'm satisfied.

All in all, it's a story tailor-made for the 24-hour news culture - big personalities, bribing, scandal, hacking, celebrities and death. Yet one network has been reticent to dumpster dive into any aspect of the story, other than the sheer disappointment at their competitor's behavior.

"The left has been out to get News Corp., especially Fox News and the Murdoch family for years this is the biggest case of piling on since the last rugby game I saw," said columnist Cal Thomas of Fox News.

If you're going to kiss Murdoch's ass with a reference, at least call it Aussie rules football!

Anyway, I thought you were going to say the biggest case of piling on since Common read a poem at the White House.

Maybe your competitors are taking an unseemly amount of pleasure in it, but they don't have Fox News' finely tuned sense of proportionality. They don't have the ability to spot real stories of criminality and import like you do.

The overreaction to this case - which is at most an epic bribery and influence-peddling scandal consuming Britain's political, law enforcement and journalistic establishment - is really a waste of everyone's time.

As a News Corp. property, maybe you're not upset that your rivaled standards have been corrupted by your own conflict-driven, scandal-boner ethic. You're upset that those guys get to have all the fun while you have to sit on your hands.

This scandal was made for you guys. The New York Post had so much fun with puns like "Obama beats Weiner" and "Osama bin Wankin.'" Those were priceless puns; I can only imagine the frustration.

They're missing out on the chance to shame a high-profile media mogul with headlines like, "Hickory Dickory 'Doch." Or throw in the death of a whistle-blower and it's just too easy - "News Corpse." Those poor bastards.