The last time you dressed up as Spiderman or Superman was probably for Halloween when you were six. You'd probably be taken for a fool if you did it now.

The last time you dressed up as Spiderman or Superman was probably for Halloween when you were six. You'd probably be taken for a fool if you did it now.

Well, HBO's upcoming documentary follows a group of everyday people who are compelled to don a costume and walk the streets fighting crime, protecting the innocent just like Batman.

"Superheroes" is a well-rounded look at the group, which is larger than you probably expected. The doc isn't overly sympathetic or judgmental.

Most of the heroes have a tragic past that involved violence or abuse. But the film never actively points out the delusion and psychological issues of these individuals; it just lets them tell their story. It's pretty obvious.

Mr. Xtreme is a security guard by day who patrols the streets of San Diego at night in a helmet, goggles and bulletproof vest.

Living alone in a ramshackle one-bedroom and amateurishly practicing marital arts, he reminds me of the quiet, dreamer kid who got picked on throughout childhood.

Master Legend is an older man who doesn't fight crime as much as strolls Orlando assisting the downtrodden. He even has a nonprofit organization. He also chugs tallboys of Busch because a superhero "works up a whopping thirst."

The biggest similarity among the subjects is their loneliness. Even a group of young, fit vigilantes, the New York Initiative, feel isolated individually.

About midway through - after you've written these people off - the tone twists to remind the audience that while most of us say they're crazy or losers, their altruism (most assist the homeless and charities) and values are unquestionable.

I wish there could've been more footage of real-life "heroes" confronting "villains," and that the filmmakers hadn't gone for such a palpable happy ending. Otherwise, "Superheroes" is a weirdly fascinating and strong documentary.