In 1966, playwright Tom Stoppard took the notion of "every exit being an entrance somewhere else" to what he called its "aesthetic, moral and logical conclusion" in his comic masterwork, "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead." Solstice Theatre Company and director C. Austin Hill bring this modern classic to hilariously vivid life at The Green Room.

In 1966, playwright Tom Stoppard took the notion of "every exit being an entrance somewhere else" to what he called its "aesthetic, moral and logical conclusion" in his comic masterwork, "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead." Solstice Theatre Company and director C. Austin Hill bring this modern classic to hilariously vivid life at The Green Room.

In chronicling the off-stage existential confusion of the two minor Shakespearean characters, "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern" flips "Hamlet" on its head in a witty dissection of the law of probability, free will, and the meanings of both life and death. The Solstice production is driven by several ferociously committed performances.

Joe Dallacqua's Guildenstern forever teeters on the edge of panic as he contemplates the awful implications of every new coin that comes up heads. Erin Fisher brings a seductive blend of blood, love and rhetoric to her portrayal of the Player, the leader of the ragtag acting troupe that stages plays within the play.

In the scenes where Stoppard's characters interact with the rest of "Hamlet," Solstice presents the latter on video, adding a new dimension to the bit players' sense of being in the middle of something they can neither understand nor control. Catch every exit and entrance of Solstice's "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern," and what you won't be able to control is your laughter.

Speaking of exits and entrances, take note that The Green Room has exited the southern side of the South Campus Gateway and entered the north side, a few steps away.