"Another Earth" is an indie drama from the Sundance Film Festival that was obviously made with a greater supply of earnestness than production funds. Although that description could apply to dozens of films, at least this one wanders into some novel territory.

"Another Earth" is an indie drama from the Sundance Film Festival that was obviously made with a greater supply of earnestness than production funds. Although that description could apply to dozens of films, at least this one wanders into some novel territory.

The story begins with the discovery of a second Earth in the sky, which coincides with 17-year-old Rhoda (Brit Marling) celebrating her acceptance to MIT to study astrophysics. As she watches the sky instead of the road on the way home, Rhoda causes a fatal accident.

Four years later, she's fresh out of prison, dazed and penitent. Rhoda means to apologize to John (William Mapother from "Lost"), the crash's only other survivor, but loses her nerve at his door.

With a concocted story about free maid service, she starts seeing John regularly. They develop a complicated relationship that, with varying levels of believability, feeds into the film's central exploration of twisted fates and second chances.

The script, co-written by Marling and director Mike Cahill, makes contrived use of radio DJ rants and TV coverage to propel the second Earth subplot, and too conveniently ignores the science part of its fiction. But the two stars play off each other well, and Marling oozes breakout potential.