Guys, no complaining when your significant other asks you to go to the latest Broadway musical to hit Columbus. "Jersey Boys" is a man's man's kind of show.

Guys, no complaining when your significant other asks you to go to the latest Broadway musical to hit Columbus. "Jersey Boys" is a man's man's kind of show.

"It's like a Scorsese film or 'The Sopranos.' It's also a story about brotherhood," said Quinn VanAntwerp, who plays Bob Gaudio, one of the show's four main characters. "Big, handle-bar-mustached men will stand up in the front row and scream like their team just won the Super Bowl."

The show tells the story of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, one of the most popular American pop bands of the 1960s. The group's four members - Valli, Gaudio, Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi - grew up in blue-collar New Jersey, where they had run-ins with mob bosses and jail cells. Their humble beginnings didn't keep them from eventually selling more than 100 million records.

"Jersey Boys" is broken down into four different segments, or "seasons," each narrated by a different member of the band.

"What's fun about 'Jersey Boys' is that you know Frankie Valli. You know that voice very well. You don't know Nick or Tommy, or especially Bobby," said VanAntwerp, pointing out that Gaudio, the group's chief songwriter, has produced music for Frank Sinatra, Neil Diamond and Michael Jackson.

"To me, you get to meet a kind of modern-day music legend when you watch 'Jersey Boys,'" he added, referring to his character.

The show is essentially a fun, doo-wop-filled history lesson. Everything that the audience sees on stage is true to life.

"That's what sets this show apart from any of the other shows that take people's musical catalogs and put them on stage - it is all a true story," VanAntwerp said. "You really feel like you know these four guys for what they went through by the end of the night. You see and hear the music within the context of how it would have been significant in their lives when they wrote it."

All of the production's music has a place in history; no new music was written for the show. The setlist includes classics such as "Big Girls Don't Cry," "Walk Like a Man" and "December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)."

"What you realize very quickly is that even if you've never heard of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, you've heard 80 percent of this music," VanAntwerp said. "That's how ubiquitous and everywhere that they are. You know it without even knowing that you know it."