While the 1985 version of "Fright Night" may have developed a cult following, it's hardly an untouchable classic. The vampire flick was merely a successful blend of comedy and horror that found a small, loyal audience.

While the 1985 version of "Fright Night" may have developed a cult following, it's hardly an untouchable classic. The vampire flick was merely a successful blend of comedy and horror that found a small, loyal audience.

Written by frequent "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" scribe Marti Noxon, the remake will probably have a following, too. It deftly alternates between amusing moments and intense action sequences.

Luckily the movie isn't bogged down by some type of crazy twist. There no question that Jerry (Colin Farrell) is a crazy killing machine, a brutal vampire who's wiping out families in a Las Vegas subdivision.

It just so happens that Charley (Anton Yelchin) and his mom (Toni Collette) are Jerry's neighbors. After Charley finds out Jerry's true nature, the film pits them against each other as Charley tries to protect his family.

Moving at a brisk pace, the film never has time to drag. In one tense scene, Charley sneaks into Jerry's house to rescue a girl inside, and shortly after, the two men battle it out in a well-crafted chase sequence with over-the-top action.

The film's cast is perhaps its weakest element. Yelchin's Charley is plain unlikable, and Farrell's Jerry is too understated to be truly menacing.

The best performance belongs to David Tennant ("Doctor Who") as magician Peter Vincent. Frequently clad in leather pants and always slightly drunk, Vincent is a hammy, exaggerated caricature. Tennant clearly had fun with the role.