Each year at Urban Scrawl in Franklinton, among indie craft vendors, food carts, and a stage full of local bands, painting becomes a spectator event.

Each year at Urban Scrawl in Franklinton, among indie craft vendors, food carts, and a stage full of local bands, painting becomes a spectator event.

Artists must work under the blazing sun of late summer and the glare of a steady stream of onlookers. Nonetheless, there's something about the experience that keeps artists coming back. Among the more than 30 artists participating this weekend in the fifth Urban Scrawl are a number of veterans returning to add to the collection of murals on wood that have been created in past years.

This year, they'll be rolling with some changes. Renovations at the original site, Dodge Park, means a new venue: recently opened studio space 400 West Rich. Artists will work outside on the facility's grounds, while inside, organizers will showcase break dancers and murals from previous Urban Scrawls.

The event has also expanded to two days, allowing artists time to get more ambitious.

"In previous years, with a single day, pace was [a huge concern], that you could actually finish your vision before the walls come down. This year will see better artworks," said artist Ashley Voss, a.k.a. Coreroc.

He's painted at every Urban Scrawl with his partner for the event, Cyrus Fire, and calls it a great networking opportunity, as well as "the best place to view live art in many shapes and styles."

As for what's coming from them this year, Fire deadpanned, "My plans are based around pattern, texture and layering of captivating characters, then to pour gasoline on the whole thing and see if I can talk someone into torching it."

Dan Gerdeman, returning for a third year with his Urban Scrawl collaborator, Ron Arps, said the live music stage is a big draw.

"This is the most non-pretentious live art event that I have ever been a part of," he added. "The artists all share what they've got. Nary a stink eye in the crowd, and lots of smiles and love."

A notable addition to the artist roster for this year is Scot Kaplan, who'll be adding a new element with "Urban Sculpt." He'll construct a galvanized steel work addressing issues of public art and homelessness, titled "The Blister."

For Kaplan and other newcomers, Voss has a lesson to share: "Use sunscreen, and find shade often."