Don't you sometimes wish you'd been as quick witted and self-aware a teenager as the characters of your favorite teen movies? It would've been nice to have John Hughes whispering in one's ear during confusing adolescent rites of passage, but real high school life isn't that tidy.

Don't you sometimes wish you'd been as quick witted and self-aware a teenager as the characters of your favorite teen movies? It would've been nice to have John Hughes whispering in one's ear during confusing adolescent rites of passage, but real high school life isn't that tidy.

Azazel Jacobs' "Terri" is a coming-of-age film with a different approach. No one, including adults, finds the perfect thing to say. The result is honest, unexpectedly deep, and genuinely funny in the movie's own odd way.

Terri, (Jacob Wysocki), an overweight 15-year-old, begins wearing pajamas to school and is resigned to constant teasing from classmates. It's hard to tell what's beneath his exterior until Terri's at home, where he's a smart, patient caretaker for his ailing uncle (Creed Bratton, in a nice departure from "The Office").

The pajamas attract the attention of Assistant Principal Fitzgerald (John C. Reilly), who begins weekly hangout sessions with Terri. The meetings are helpful for Terri and spark friendships with other school pariahs: a hyper troublemaker and a pretty girl whose popularity was lost to a sex scandal in Home Economics class.

Terri's evolution is naturally awkward, and Wysocki's sweet, hesitant portrayal easily snares the viewer's empathy.

The comically earnest, slightly lost performance by Reilly is just as effective. He's the ideal authority figure - one whose best advice on life, given by example, is that everyone's figuring things out as they go.