"Jersey Boys" turns baby boomers into high schoolers. As soon as the music starts at the Ohio Theatre, the older audience members become giddy, cheering on the singers on stage, cuddling up to their honeys and - like the couple in front of me last Friday night - making out during each of the songs.

"Jersey Boys" turns baby boomers into high schoolers. As soon as the music starts at the Ohio Theatre, the older audience members become giddy, cheering on the singers on stage, cuddling up to their honeys and - like the couple in front of me last Friday night - making out during each of the songs.

While the music of The Four Seasons may not stir Gen-Xers' and -Yers' sense of nostalgia, it's timeless , and we've been exposed to it unwittingly. That music is at the heart of "Jersey Boys," a fun, fast-paced and often humorous history lesson about the popular quartet.

The play opens with a flurry of brief scenes and is divided into four "seasons," each narrated by a member of The Four Seasons: Tommy DeVito, the group's bad boy and surrogate big brother, played by Matt Bailey, who has a superb sense of comedic timing; hit songwriter Bob Gaudio, portrayed by the understated Quinn VanAntwerp; Nick Massi, whom actor Steve Gouveia plays as (mostly) calm and classy; and of course, Frankie Valli.

Joseph Leo Bwarie makes the audience swoon when he skillfully channels Valli's signature falsetto during songs such as "Sherry," "Big Girls Don't Cry" and "Walk Like A Man." The four lead actors rise to the occasion during both concert-like performances and sometimes emotionally demanding dialogue. When the group is singing, they might as well be the real Four Seasons.

The Angels, the female troupe that performs an overly boisterous rendition of "My Boyfriend's Back," were a bit less authentic. But overall, the show offers joyful time travel through music, an absorbing, true storyline that flexes actors' chops and impressive attention to detail, e.g. the plastic covering an Italian family's living room furniture.