Maybe I shouldn't have tempered my expectations about "Death Valley." After watching its gory, hilarious trailer - filled with exploding zombie heads, vampires and werewolves running amok - I thought, "This can't be as good as it looks."

Maybe I shouldn't have tempered my expectations about "Death Valley." After watching its gory, hilarious trailer - filled with exploding zombie heads, vampires and werewolves running amok - I thought, "This can't be as good as it looks."

See, for more than a year now MTV has rolled out a bunch of original, scripted programming, which is commendable, but I haven't been particularly impressed.

Until recently. It looks like MTV is finding a nice balance between catering to its younger audience and presenting some capable shows.

"Teen Wolf" wasn't as horrible as expected, "Awkward" has sarcastic fun with the high school drama/romance stuff, and the return of "Beavis and Butt-Head" is on the horizon.

"Death Valley" is basically "Reno 911" with zombies, vampires and werewolves. A squad of goofball cops, the Undead Task Force, hunts down supernatural baddies while a camera crew follows.

While it's not "Reno 911" hilarious, it's pretty funny and never shies away from the gore. Perfect example: zombie bowling with a squad car.

There's also plenty of mocking banter nicely delivered by a cast of up-and-comers. You'll recognize funnyman Bryan Callen and Tania Raymonde from "Lost," and other cast members (Charlie Sanders, Bryce Johnson, Texas Battle) will probably elicit thoughts of "Where have I seen him before?"

Even if they're not household names, Sanders, Johnson and Battle prove they have a knack for comedy.