Replacing a plot about losing an arm with one about temporarily sucking at golf, "Seven Days in Utopia" has a lot in common with surprise spring hit "Soul Surfer." Both films are unexpectedly watchable, feel-good flicks that are crippled by an overt dose of Christianity.

Replacing a plot about losing an arm with one about temporarily sucking at golf, "Seven Days in Utopia" has a lot in common with surprise spring hit "Soul Surfer." Both films are unexpectedly watchable, feel-good flicks that are crippled by an overt dose of Christianity.

After amateur golfer Luke Chisholm (Lucas Black) self-destructs at a tournament and crashes his car into a field in Utopia, Texas, he sets out to rediscover his game with the help of former golfer Johnny Crawford (Robert Duvall).

Reminiscent of Mr. Miyagi from "The Karate Kid," Johnny uses a series of unorthodox techniques, including fishing, painting and tossing rings into a can, to get Luke's game back.

But when Johnny gives Luke a bible and leads him to the church, the film gets overly preachy and the narrative thread comes apart. The film would have been better served to speak its message through the little moments, like saying grace before a meal.

There's nothing overly special about "Utopia" - all of the performances from this strong cast, which also includes Kathy Baker and recent Oscar winner Melissa Leo, are simply okay - but it's a uncomplicated, easygoing movie with a good intent that should follow in "Soul Surfer's" successful footsteps.