For all the different things that come together on the screen, I go to movies to be told stories.

For all the different things that come together on the screen, I go to movies to be told stories.

And if you tell me that story well, I'm willing to squint past some plot holes and overlook some clunky dialogue. "The Debt" tells a story like that.

When we meet Rachel Singer (Helen Mirren) in 1997, she's a scarred former Mossad agent who was involved in a secret operation to capture a Nazi war criminal.

We watch that operation unfold in East Berlin in 1966. A young Rachel (Jessica Chastain) joins two male agents (Marton Csokas and Sam Worthington) on a mission to capture and extract a former Nazi surgeon who engaged in grotesque experiments on Jews.

To give away much more would spoil the ride. And the storytelling ride is the best part of "The Debt," a cinematic page-turner in the vein of last year's "The Ghost Writer."

Deception is the key here, and director John Madden ("Shakespeare in Love") uses some misdirection as the story unfolds against our initial expectations.

The stellar cast is on point. Mirren is a bit underused, but Chastain - who seems to be in everything now - finally gets a role to really to sink her teeth into.

My viewing companion was less forgiving of flaws in plot and dialogue. The twisty storytelling thrilled me past them.