"A bird can fly. So can I." So begins Akron artist Johnny Yanok's most beloved childhood book, "I Can Fly," published by Golden Books. "I Can Fly" was illustrated by Mary Blair, known for her concept art for Disney films like "Cinderella" and "Alice in Wonderland" and the Disneyland ride It's A Small World.

"A bird can fly. So can I." So begins Akron artist Johnny Yanok's most beloved childhood book, "I Can Fly," published by Golden Books. "I Can Fly" was illustrated by Mary Blair, known for her concept art for Disney films like "Cinderella" and "Alice in Wonderland" and the Disneyland ride It's A Small World.

The beloved kids' series of stories with the golden binding also likely sparked his adoration of art.

"I loved Golden Books," Yanok said. "I'd study the art in there. I guess that's where it all started. I've kind of always been doing cartoons. My mom said I've always had a crayon in my hand. Since I could sit up. I've always liked drawing and asked for crayons and papers."

Today, Yanok wields his own wand of whimsy. Imagery from mid-century illustrations, vintage Halloween cartoons and flea markets all collide to become the innocently humorous characters in the CCAD graduate's paintings, illustrations and sculptural creations.

Yanok used to buy Target gift cards, put $1 on them and then use their illustrations and patterns as inspiration, too. Then Target called.

"They had seen my work online," Yanok said. The national shopping chain liked his art so much, it commissioned him to design his own Target gift cards, an offer he described as "pretty awesome and flattering."

Yanok's loveable cartoons will play at Rivet gallery throughout September. About 10 of his gouache and digital works will be on view beside the illustrations of Lauren Gregg, a Georgia resident who has illustrated for clients like Disney, Nickelodeon and Bitch magazine.

Short North Tattoo

The tattoo shop's new show, called "OHSK8," gave 64 artists each a wooden skateboard to use as a blank canvas. The show is the inaugural local version of "LVSK8," a similar Las Vegas exhibit whose curator and executive producer, Michael Todoran, recently moved to Columbus. Artists in previous shows transformed the boards into things like a painted Band-Aid and the carved mock body of a violin, complete with F-holes. Visit OHSK8 to see what artists from Ohio, Iowa, Australia and New York have created.

Sharon Weiss Gallery

Richard Lillash spent the past 20 years working as an illustrator for advertising and editorial campaigns. The local artist's recent oil paintings represent his rediscovery of the medium, exploring the work of traditional impressionists and plein-air Californians. His wispy landscapes and portraits are secluded scenes meant to make the viewer contemplate things that normally go unnoticed or neglected.