Bum Wealthy's second album was nearly finished when a thief broke into frontman Steven Roumeliote's Campus-area home and stole thousands of dollars he had saved up to fund the final stages of mixing, mastering and reproduction.

Bum Wealthy's second album was nearly finished when a thief broke into frontman Steven Roumeliote's Campus-area home and stole thousands of dollars he had saved up to fund the final stages of mixing, mastering and reproduction.

"I always kind of liked the vibe of alleyways until that went down," Roumeliote said.

The sudden financial crisis pushed back the album indefinitely, but it didn't send the genre-jumping rock band into a tailspin. Instead, they kept playing shows, working day jobs and biding their time.

A year and a half later - and almost exactly three years since the release of debut "Bumper Crop" - the album will be released Saturday with a show at Woodlands Tavern. It's better for the wait; in the interim, Bum Wealthy tacked on one more song, the fan favorite "Penniless Princess."

"It was kind of the period of a good sentence," Roumeliote said.

Besides strengthening the tracklist, the stomping rocker's lyrics provided an album title that sums up the whole project: "Cardboard Kingdom." According to the band, the title captures a duality that comes up repeatedly in these songs.

"A third-world country … you have nothing, but it's still your kingdom. All the stuff you have that's valuable to you doesn't involve money," Roumeliote said. "Things that have monetary value, that's kind of a fickle, fleeting type of a kingdom. You can be on the top of the world, and then the next day it's all coming down like cardboard."

If the album represents the band's credo, it also showcases their flair for diversity. Blues, funk, indie, jazz, reggae and more are in the cauldron.

"Even though we do bounce around stylistically on the album, there's still plenty of stuff we actually do that isn't represented," Roumeliote said. "It's good to be in a band that has that kind of flexibility."

Photo by Joe Maiorana