Tradition: A buffet or seated dinner followed by the cutting of cake and the smashing of said cake into your newly betrothed's kisser

Photos by Adam Lowe Photography

Tradition: A buffet or seated dinner followed by the cutting of cake and the smashing of said cake into your newly betrothed's kisser

Trends: Local food and booze; food trucks; cupcake, candy and pie tables; late-night snacks

German Village residents Scott Elder and Chad Huguenin can't remember the last time they went to a chain restaurant.

"We're locovores to the extent that we can be," Elder said. "We're very motivated by stimulating the local economy and rewarding local businesses with our support."

For their ceremony next month at the Victorian-style Taylor Mansion, the couple is going as local as possible with their autumn-centric event's food.

They picked apples at Lynd's Fruit Farm in Pataskala to use as decorations and made jars of apple butter for guest favors. Sassafras Bakery will serve apple crumb, bourbon pumpkin and buttermilk pecan pies. Guests will sip on OYO vodka, Watershed gin, and Columbus Brewing Company and Great Lakes beers (Chad's parents live up north).

Dinner will be catered by The Upper Crust, and Elder said the company is working with them to use local food ingredients.

"It's very difficult for catering companies to use all local food, which is something I didn't even think about," Elder said. "But they've been awesome to work with and are using local produce when they can. … It creates an additional cost that we're OK with paying because it's important to us."

Other couples are going local by having food trucks serve at their reception or post-party food hour, a light-hearted way to feed the masses.

The Cheesy Truck, for example, already has two inquiries for weddings next spring. Couples can, with at least a month's notice, design their own gooey menu. Cost is determined by guest count, hours and ingredients in addition to a minimum hourly base rate.