Psandwich's song "Something to Prove" leads off with a mission statement of sorts.

Psandwich’s song “Something to Prove” leads off with a mission statement of sorts.

“I’m the most dangerous kind of 50-year-old,” Ron House declares in his distinct nasally snarl. The verse concludes, “And I’ve got something to prove and nothing to lose.”

House, who carved himself a permanent place in record nerd lore as frontman for The Great Plains and Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments, dreaded the thought of being reduced to history while still breathing. But five decades deep, starting a relevant new band seemed daunting.

“I didn’t think it was possible,” House said. “It’s weird how the mind is.”

He certainly couldn’t have predicted that he’d stumble into such a unit via the Rock Potluck, an annual event in which Columbus musicians are shuffled into new bands for a day.

House’s Potluck group, then called Sandwitch, was exceptionally accomplished: Brett Burleson (The Tough & Lovely), John Olexovitch (The Lindsay), Bobby Silver (Brainbow) and Zac Szymusiak (Washington Beach Bums). After the Potluck, at Szymusiak’s suggestion, they kept playing. And playing. And playing.

“The music was probably the secondary thing,” House said. “It was just being with people that you could laugh with and have a good time.”

Almost three years later, the camaraderie runs deep — Olexovitch called playing in Psandwich “an honor” — as does the humor. “Ron House is a god among many small woodland creatures,” Silver said over Skype from a tour stop with Blueprint.

Amidst the fun and games, they’ve been toiling on an album that stands toe to toe with anything in their stacked collective catalog. “Northren Psych,” released this month on Columbus Discount Records, is a mystical punk-rock party record that pounds and churns with the best of them.

They’ll celebrate Friday at Ace of Cups, after which they’re antsy to concoct more bizarre, euphoric music together.

“It doesn’t seem like it can get old anytime soon,” Burleson said.