Hudson Street Hooligans have always been dedicated to boosting the spirits of their beloved Crew. These days the soccer superfans are hard at work on their own behalf.

Hudson Street Hooligans have always been dedicated to boosting the spirits of their beloved Crew. These days the soccer superfans are hard at work on their own behalf.

Two months after the city revoked the Hooligans' certificate of occupancy, the supporters club is still raising funds and fighting red tape in an effort to get their private soccer pub back in business. The road ahead remains long.

"I think we're going to figure out a way to make it work," spokesman Blake Compton said. "It's just very taxing."

An inspector shut down the pub July 28 after discovering that the Hooligans, who were unaware of any code violations, had been using their space at the corner of Summit Street and East Oakland Avenue as a private club.

The building is zoned for "mercantile" use, not "assembly." In order to get the zoning changed and the pub reopened, the group needs to make more than $50,000 worth of renovations and apply for numerous permits.

The University Area Commission recently voted 8-5 to recommend Hooligans for a parking variance, which would allow the club to operate without the legally mandated number of parking spaces. The endorsement should help the Hooligans' chances with the Board of Zoning Appeals, which is currently reviewing the case.

The Hooligans are also awaiting approval for a building permit to begin work on the necessary safety updates, which include a fireproof ceiling, handicap accessibility, out-swinging doors and new emergency exit lights.

As for how to fund the renovations, the group has raised about $5,000 and is in the process of drawing up a plan to allow new investors to buy a stake in the bar.

"We have a core group of members who have spoken out and said they were willing to do that," Compton said. "We just need to have some plan in place for them."

Hooligans opened back up for each of the six home game days since the shutdown, but at a steep cost. Temporary limited occupancy permits, building permit fees, Zoning Board of Appeals fees, inspection fees and wages for an on-site firefighter added up to more than $1,000 per match.

That expense might be worth it; fan interest has been surging.

"We sold out of our tickets for the D.C. game, which was a surprise," Compton said. "L.A. Galaxy was the biggest draw we've had for tickets and bar sales ever, so that was a plus."