What's coming straight outta Compton these days? Not threats of gun violence, but promises that "I'm trying to better my craft and stay relevant." Not the siren-blaring anger and desperation of "F--- tha Police," but a tripped-out, wobbly jazz think piece called "F--- Your Ethnicity."

What's coming straight outta Compton these days? Not threats of gun violence, but promises that "I'm trying to better my craft and stay relevant." Not the siren-blaring anger and desperation of "F--- tha Police," but a tripped-out, wobbly jazz think piece called "F--- Your Ethnicity."

Kendrick Lamar, anointed as heir to Compton's hip-hop throne by none other than Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg, bears few marks of their legacy, though Dre's signature G-funk creeps into the new "Section.80" mixtape at times. Lamar is firmly entrenched in the moody, conflicted mold popularized by Kanye circa-"808s and Heartbreak" and perfected by Drake, whom Lamar will open for in Columbus next month. (Do I smell Curren$y in the mix too?)

Before that big Schott show, he'll headline the third installment of Kingsrowe's concert/party hybrid Animal House this Friday at Skully's with Fabrashay A.