Everyone jokes that Hollywood has run out of ideas, and this weekend brings a box-office showdown between two remakes of movies most people thought should be left alone: "Footloose" and "The Thing."

Everyone jokes that Hollywood has run out of ideas, and this weekend brings a box-office showdown between two remakes of movies most people thought should be left alone: "Footloose" and "The Thing."

But not all remakes have been horrible piles of cinematic blasphemy and shameless profiteering! Only most of them! Here's a breakdown of some good and some bad.

Remakes that don't suck

"Disturbia"

Remaking Hitchcock's "Rear Window" for a teen audience seemed like a terrible idea, but it worked, thanks to some real tension and a charming pre-"Transformers" Shia LaBeouf.

"Rise of the Planet of the Apes"

OK, so it's a franchise reboot, not technically a remake, but it was so unexpectedly and amazingly good, I actually want sequels. It was one of the surprise hits in a summer of meh.

"Funny Games"

Director Michael Haneke remakes his foreign-language thriller for American audiences with Tim Roth and Naomi Watts. The results are nearly as good as the original.

"The Ring"

Yes, it started an unfortunate trend of every scary Japanese movie at the time getting Americanized, but director Gore Verbinski really nailed the tension and scared the hell out of audiences.

"Dawn of the Dead"

Zombie fans pretty much treat George Romero movies as gospel, but Zack Snyder's slick remake hit the right notes and got him enough clout to make more stylized projects like "300."

Remakes that do suck

"Psycho"

OK, I actually admire the sheer audacity of Gus Van Sant's shot-for-shot remake of Hitchcock's classic. But, in retrospect, the casting of Vince Vaughn in the Anthony Perkins role seems worse than ever.

"Planet of the Apes"

Tim Burton's first revisiting of the "Apes" franchise was more "damn" and "dirty" in its connection to the originals, but it was also lifeless and just not all that entertaining.

"The Vanishing"

Director George Sluizer remakes his foreign-language thriller for American audiences and changes way too much. The results are nowhere near as good as the original.

"Godzilla"

Roland Emmerich's "Godzilla" had a big budget and tremendous hype. How could it miss? Turns out Matthew Broderick doesn't really scream "action star," and the camp of the Japanese originals didn't translate.

"The Texas Chainsaw Massacre"

Nearly all of the Michael Bay-produced horror remakes are awful, but this one was head-scratchingly divergent from a great original that could have just gotten a fresh coat of paint.