Those worrying that their fond memories of 1984's "Footloose" will be tainted by the 2011 remake can rest a little easier. Director Craig Brewer ("Hustle and Flow") hasn't messed with its ludicrous but wildly popular tale of teen rebellion in a town that has outlawed dancing.

Those worrying that their fond memories of 1984's "Footloose" will be tainted by the 2011 remake can rest a little easier. Director Craig Brewer ("Hustle and Flow") hasn't messed with its ludicrous but wildly popular tale of teen rebellion in a town that has outlawed dancing.

In fact, with just some minor adjustments for the passage of time, Brewer has basically made the same film over again.

Dancer-actor Kenny Wormald steps into the Kevin Bacon role of Ren. As before, his big-city, happy-footed ways clash with the authorities in his new hometown of Bomont, such as Dennis Quaid's uptight preacher, and spark the interest of the preacher's daughter Ariel (Julianne Hough).

Ren's beater Volkswagen Bug is also back from the original, as are Ariel's iconic red cowboy boots. Favorite scenes like Ren's rage-induced freeform dance through a factory also reappear, sometimes shot-for-shot.

The new "Footloose" has a few things of its own to recommend, such as some high-test smoldering from Wormald, and fun supporting performances from Ray McKinnon and Miles Teller.

It's also got a more diverse playlist than the pop-centered choices made in 1984, and it reworks some of those '80s songs.

But like Hough's version of those red boots, most of these choices feel trendy and focus-grouped, not comfortable and lived in. The movie's made to appeal to the widest demographic possible.

"Footloose" fans may appreciate Brewer's otherwise slavish devotion to his source, but a little more breakout individualism wouldn't have hurt.