When Rachael Ranney was growing up in Grandview Heights, her grandfather often took her shopping. Not to the mall, but to flea markets and thrift stores. He was a woodworker and "very crafty," she said. He passed the attribute on to her.

When Rachael Ranney was growing up in Grandview Heights, her grandfather often took her shopping. Not to the mall, but to flea markets and thrift stores. He was a woodworker and "very crafty," she said. He passed the attribute on to her.

Ranney's resourcefulness grew as she did. She worked on farms, taking care of and riding horses. Growing up in a barn, she said, taught her the importance of reuse and self-dependence.

As an adult, those lessons translated to a wooden thumb. Ranney crafted decor projects on a budget while studying at Ohio State. But all that was just a hobby. Being a veterinary technician was her plan.

That is, until she went to Kinopicz American, a local HD video production studio, to meet a friend for lunch.

"I just thought I was going to Chipotle," Ranney said, laughing.

Instead she got a job.

Kinopicz American had been tossing around ideas of adding another DIY-focused video series to a client's website, Buildipedia.com. Ranney's friend, who is an editor at Kinopicz, introduced her to the studio's producers. They were immediately impressed with the 26-year-old's charm and passion for making things.

"She's a natural talent," said producer Jennifer Randle, "and a joy to work with."

Buildipedia's website debuted {Re}habitat last week, with Ranney as host. The online how-to video series is filmed and edited in Columbus. It gives guidelines for repurposed decor projects; the first episode featured an outdoor fire pit made from a wood-burning stove.

The show is stylishly edited; a boring tutorial this is not. And producers hope to tap into the growing community that embraces, as both Randle and Ranney put it, "the Clintonville chicken coop idea" - people wanting to do things for themselves.

"There's a real movement for picking up some more self-reliance," Randle said. "Why did we let these old self-sufficiencies fall by the wayside? There's a growing market for people who don't want to buy from some big box store."

Future {Re}habitat tutorials include an armchair made from found leather belts attached to a salvaged chair frame and a redesigned old door that acts as storage shelves in a bathroom.

They're all projects Ranney would have made anyway.

"I have so many ideas," she said. "I can't help it. I've always just done this for myself."