In nearly 22 years of Wexner Center presentations, few have been as simple or as memorable as Jerome Bel's "The Show Must Go On" in March 2005. Next week Bel and company return to Columbus to present the most recent entry in a series of works conceived and directed by Bel. Each of the works focuses on an individual dancer to illuminate dance from the inside out.

In nearly 22 years of Wexner Center presentations, few have been as simple or as memorable as Jerome Bel's "The Show Must Go On" in March 2005. Next week Bel and company return to Columbus to present the most recent entry in a series of works conceived and directed by Bel. Each of the works focuses on an individual dancer to illuminate dance from the inside out.

In the case of "Cedric Andrieux," that individual is, of course, the French dancer Cedric Andrieux. Andrieux spent eight years performing with the dance company of Merce Cunningham, who revolutionized choreography and its relationship to music and the visual arts, followed by a stint with France's Lyon Opera Ballet.

As he explains in his notes to "Cedric Andrieux," Bel has created this series to "mark the place where the life of an individual intersects with the history of dance." Alone on stage, Andrieux will convey his own story using both words and movement, punctuating it with excerpts from dances from his past, such as Cunningham's "Biped," Trisha Brown's "Newark," and "The Show Must Go On." Each work constitutes a chapter in the dancer's education, reliving the heart and body aches, recalling the attainments and disappointments.

Toward the end of his namesake work, Andrieux sums up Bel's aesthetic, "You are a person before you are a dancer."