The legacy of William Shakespeare's "Romeo & Juliet" is as boundless as the stars crossing the night sky, and the archetypal tale of luckless lovers gets a current-day spin in "Radio & Juliet."

The legacy of William Shakespeare's "Romeo & Juliet" is as boundless as the stars crossing the night sky, and the archetypal tale of luckless lovers gets a current-day spin in "Radio & Juliet."

Beginning when Juliet wakes up to Romeo's dead body, the Ballet Maribor show expresses her sadness, confusion, anger and desperate love and asks what would have happened if she had decided not to kill herself.

The dances, performed by one woman and six men, are all set to Radiohead songs. The transcendent music creates an uncomfortable haze for Juliet's journey through memory, happiness and pain. The music's modernity emphasizes that the story still has something to teach us so many love stories later.

"It's classical dance, but you see this very fast movement inside of it. It's clever," said Stephane Fournial, a former ballet dancer whose agency represents the Slovenian ballet troupe.

"Radio & Juliet" choreographer Edward Clug is a Radiohead-head, and he translated its music with a true fan's sense of responsibility. Songs come from "The Bends," "OK Computer," "Kid A," "Amnesiac" and "Hail to the Thief."

Grainy videos in the background add another visual element and, at times, add to the sense of isolation the dance is expressing.

"The first impact is that it's really something amazing," Fournial said. "I'm never tired to watch this show. It's still exciting. It means a lot."

Each time he watches the show, Fournial added, it offers him some kind of new perspective - an experience similar to listening to the music the ballet uses as muse.