Ray Klimek and Rajorshi Ghosh take what most of us would consider trash or a ruined landscape and turn it into art. The two Ohio University assistant professors have both documented man's effect on the areas where they grew up.

Ray Klimek and Rajorshi Ghosh take what most of us would consider trash or a ruined landscape and turn it into art. The two Ohio University assistant professors have both documented man's effect on the areas where they grew up.

"We realized there's a common theme of waste in both of our work," Klimek explained. Their joint exhibition this month at ROY G BIV, "Residues," just goes to show that nothing is wasted on a good artist.

Klimek was raised in northeastern Pennsylvania, near abandoned coal mines where he would often play. The setting has inspired Klimek to create a photo series, "Carbon/Analog," which captures the sense of fantasy and adventure he felt there as a kid.

"What's so fascinating is partly that it lends itself to whatever we want it to be," Klimek said of the black mound-covered landscape. "It's a place where you can play army, you can play cowboys and Indians, you can play anything that your imagination can come up with."

He often stylizes the photos to resemble official NASA images or pictures of the nighttime sky.

"From a distance, it looks kind of astronomical and then you get closer up and you realize that it's spoils sometimes," he said of the glittering coal residue.

Ghosh, whose "Ganges" series last year at OSU's Urban Arts Space showed video footage of items floating in the Indian river, has contributed a series of what he calls "reconfigured" communist propaganda posters found on the streets of Calcutta, his hometown. There is also a lightbox installation modeled after a broken lightbox found in Cairo's Tahrir Square that bore an image of Egypt's former president, Hosni Mubarak.

The centerpiece of Ghosh's work, though, will be "Landscape with Kites," a video installation that shows thousands of kites - birds of prey - flying over Delhi. Locals believe spirits from the city's violent past reside on the wings of the birds.

Rivet Gallery

A while back, Jeff Lamm left art school to focus on his hardcore punk band. Sounds like a cool guy, right? The artist, who says he's inspired by pop art and vintage manga, will show drawings and paintings of his not-particularly-scary creatures, which are produced as toys by Unbox Industries. The exhibition opening doubles as a toy release party, and several new toys - a horned, one-eyed guy named M 5 Bravo and his spiky friend named Stee Gar - will be available for purchase. Rivet will also sell T-shirts designed by Lamm exclusively for the event.

Sean Christopher Gallery

Nicole Langille, an adjunct faculty member at both CCAD and OSU, uses oil paintings and ink wash drawings to investigate the idea of lines. Her work often layers lines so that some of the segments are obscured, and she explains in her artist statement for the exhibition that the purpose is to examine "strategies of covering, weaving and visually disrupting information."