There's no substitute for the great outdoors, but those who want to venture into the cold to get fit ought to outfit themselves with the proper attire. We stopped by B1 Bicycles, The Outdoor Source and FrontRunner to get gear tips for braving the elements to bike, hike and jog. Many of these products will work fine for any outdoor sport, so mix and match as you please. -Chris DeVille

There's no substitute for the great outdoors, but those who want to venture into the cold to get fit ought to outfit themselves with the proper attire. We stopped by B1 Bicycles, The Outdoor Source and FrontRunner to get gear tips for braving the elements to bike, hike and jog. Many of these products will work fine for any outdoor sport, so mix and match as you please. -Chris DeVille

5 TIPS FOR WINTER WORKOUTS:

• Dress as if it were 20 degrees warmer. If you're comfortably toasty before you get started, you'll undoubtedly overheat once your body gets pumping. Then your sweat-soaked clothes will make you colder than you were to start with.

• Wear layers. Make it easy to adjust your insulation by donning clothes you can easily peel off.

• Cotton is rotten. Wool or polyester garments will wick the sweat off your body to keep you dry. This is especially important with socks; moisture buildup is a key cause of blisters.

• Movement means warmth. The parts of your body that move a lot - namely your legs and arms - need less insulation. Your core and extremities such as head, hands and feet often require more protection from the elements.

• Stay hydrated. Your body needs water in the winter, too, even if you don't feel as thirsty as you would in the scorching summer sun.

Hiking and trail running (Outdoor Source)

Core: A giant parka will only cause you to overheat. Start with a base layer like the merino wool Icebreaker Bodyfit shirt ($50) or the synthetic Patagonia Capilene ($45). Colder climes demand a second layer; try a light fleece like Patagonia's R1 Pullover ($119), a synthetic Polartec garment with a grid pattern designed to push moisture out from your body.

Head and hands: Icebreaker's merino wool cap ($24) will warm your cranium, while their merino wool glove liner ($28) works as a good base layer under heavier gloves.

Feet: Protect your feet from puddles with an effective GORE-TEX trail running shoe like Salomon's XA Pro 3D Ultra 2 GTX ($145). As for socks, try SmartWool PhD crew socks ($16) or, on exceptionally wet days, Bridgedale's synthetic blend ($16).

Accessories: A 70-ounce CamelBak backpack ($75) will quench your thirst and provide space to stash discarded layers of clothing, while Leki trekking poles (from $99) can take some of the strain off your joints, especially with snow baskets attached to the bottom.

Jogging and road running (FrontRunner)

Core: Asics Core long sleeve T-shirt ($30) makes a good base layer. A lightweight jacket/vest like Under Armour's convertible jacket ($100) allows you adjust from cool to cold to downright frigid.

Head and hands: Mittens like Sugoi's wind mitt ($28) will keep your hands 10-15 degrees warmer than gloves due to heat conducting from finger to finger. Mizuno's Breath Thermo beanie ($20), cap ($30) or headband ($20) will warm your noggin.

Legs: For days when shorts simply won't do, Brooks Vapor-Dry stadium pant ($70) ought to work.

Feet: Even in winter, road running usually doesn't involve running through standing water, so your usual shoe will probably do the trick, but GORE-TEX shoes like the Nike Air Pegasus ($110) are on the market. More important is a cotton-free wicking sock like the array of SmartWool products (from $16).

Accessories: Sport-Wash detergent ($10) will restore performance and remove odors from high-tech polyester. YakTrax Walker ($20) and YakTrax Pro ($30) are like snow tires for your shoes. When it's dark out, stay visible with something like Nite Beams LED arm and leg bands ($15).

Cycling and mountain biking (B1)

Core: On a bike, you need extra wind protection from something like Endura's Fusion Soft Shell Jacket ($140) over your wicking base layer. On slightly more temperate days, try the Endura Gridlock Jacket ($100), which could double as an everyday lightweight jacket.

Head and hands: A Garneau balaclava ($21) will protect your neck from intense cold. The company's microfiber caps ($35) and headbands ($20) are also helpful, as are Garneau's wind- and waterproof Lathi gloves ($50).

Legs: For commuter biking, your usual jeans or slacks will do. For serious cycling, try Endura's Thermolite Pro Biblongs ($115).

Feet: For extra protection, wear Endura's road overshoe ($40) over your normal shoes.