Those who can't do, teach? Hardly. The sprawling exhibition "Down on Town" is a testament to the idiocy of that idiom. The show, currently on view at the OSU Urban Arts Space, features the work of 24 faculty members of the Ohio State University's Department of Art.

Those who can't do, teach? Hardly.

The sprawling exhibition "Down on Town" is a testament to the idiocy of that idiom. The show, currently on view at the OSU Urban Arts Space, features the work of 24 faculty members of the Ohio State University's Department of Art. The robust display of media - from painting to video, sculpture to prose - proves that this higher-ed staff has a deep bench.

Technology and art intersect in the work of Shane Mecklenburger. He printed screenshots of himself making eBay purchases of certificates of ownership. The fake, diploma-style papers let him "buy" proof of possession of whatever he typed - "United States of America," "Money" and "Education." They acknowledge some products' promise that you can have anything, real or imagined, with just seven easy payments of impossible.

Mecklenburger's work gets interactive in "Teoro-ee 1.0 (Fortress of Solitude)." Viewers man the control stick in front of a screen. The control stick determines the movement of a series of pixilated designs, their paths still evident behind them. What results is art formed by layers of personal decisions and motivations. (Mecklenburger will be giving a free lecture on his "Down on Town" work from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 10.)

Photographer Kate Shannon focused on the contradictions that common circumstances can offer visually. She photographed candid shots of people looking at or walking between fun attractions at carnivals and fairs and then removed the background imagery. The facial expressions that are left create unexpected portraiture.

"Down on Town" includes several immersive installations. Walk through Charles Massey Jr.'s study of how communal and personal memory can intertwine, or revel in the beautifully carved poplar walls of "One Hundred Handfuls of Air" by Rebecca Harvey and Steven Thurston.

Visitors to the free show would be amiss not to read the artists' statements. They have interesting references to things like The Velvet Underground and a Ralph Waldo Emerson essay. The statement from Malcolm Cochran about the Goodale Park fountain he created addresses both the joys and trials of creating public art.

They might be teachers, but they're still learning too.