Davy Rothbart's professional love affair with found notes started on his car windshield, where one day he found a note meant not for him but for a guy named Mario who was in hot water with the writer, a girl named Amber.

Davy Rothbart's professional love affair with found notes started on his car windshield, where one day he found a note meant not for him but for a guy named Mario who was in hot water with the writer, a girl named Amber.

The note has to be seen to be appreciated, but the gist is this: Amber (who mistook Rothbart's car for Mario's) is steamed that Mario is at another girl's house when he's supposed to be at work. She swears at him and swears him off. The last line: "P.S. Page me later."

It's the kind of note we've received or written through adolescence, through crushes, flames and flings. And it's the kind of note that thrills Rothbart to this day, nine years later. Shortly after discovering Amber's note, Rothbart launched Found magazine, a printed showcase of found scribbled flotsam and jetsam.

In 2004, Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett created the Found Footage Festival, which employed the same aesthetic as Found Magazine but took advantage of media that don't work in print. Prueher and Pickett took their show on the road, screening videotapes discovered at garage sales, thrift stores and in Dumpsters.

"What I liked about it was that their tone was similar. It came from a place of respect. They have some insane clips, but at the bottom of it is respect for the people we share the world with," Rothbart said. "We're not completely about laughing about other people - it's laughing with them."

For the first time, Found Footage Festival and Found magazine are taking their show on the road together. Found vs. Found's Columbus stop will feature three rounds, 12 minutes each, of the respective camps showing the best of their found stuff to an audience that will cheer for its favorites. The Rothbart brothers will be there, and so will Prueher and Pickett. It will be a battle royale of things meant for someone else but shared with an audience.

"I like to mostly pick out all-time favorites that make you laugh out loud or tear up. There are some others that people have given to us on tour. You kind of know it when you see it," Rothbart said. "I love all finds. Each one is sort of absorbing and compelling in its own way."