My boyfriend's employer unexpectedly transferred him to a new position in Chicago. We have been together for two years, and I am heartbroken that he has to leave. I am unable to join him due to my job being in Columbus and am terrified at the thought of losing him if we grow apart. I know it's possible to have a long-distance romance, but how do people manage them?

My boyfriend's employer unexpectedly transferred him to a new position in Chicago. We have been together for two years, and I am heartbroken that he has to leave. I am unable to join him due to my job being in Columbus and am terrified at the thought of losing him if we grow apart. I know it's possible to have a long-distance romance, but how do people manage them?

Signed,

Heartbroken Hannah

Dear Heartbroken Hannah,

Long-distance romances (LDR) have such a bad reputation! The fact is, not all relationships can withstand long distances. However, have faith - many couples do successfully manage theirs. Assuming your relationship is worth fighting for, it's time to pull up your big-girl panties and find a way to make this work!

First things first. Expect that things will change and be very different for a while - this won't be easy and it will require a lot of work from both of you.

Living in separate cities will feel like an emotional roller coaster, so feeling stabilized and secure as you transition without him is essential. Creating a plan for managing logistics (visits), feelings and expectations are just a few key elements to making this work, but most important are trust and communication.

The first step in your plan is making sure you're on the same page. Do both of you want a LDR? Is your long-term goal to reconnect and get married? Whether your goal is marriage in two years or you finding a new job in Chicago ASAP, sit down together and communicate. Clear expectations and a mutual understanding of your plan will create the stable foundation you will need.

Talk constantly. Do anything to maintain the connection: chatting, texting, emailing, Skyping and even sexting. Keep a steady stream of communication, but be mindful of the potential for misinterpretation in emails and texts. A comment about your lunch with a cute new co-worker is fine over the phone, but without tonality in a text or email, it could send your partner into a jealous tailspin. Insecurity is inevitable when couples miss each other and/or haven't seen each other in a while.

Bottom line: Don't be sad - take this chance and have faith. Keep your emotions and insecurities in check, remain positive, keep things as normal as possible and most importantly be strong for each other!

This will be just as difficult for him to live in a new city as it is for you to carry on without him here. Oh, and absence does make the heart grow fonder ... just wait for your first reunion!

Nicci Sprouse runs a dating service and is developing a television show for Jane.TV. Follow her on Twitter at @AskNicci. And send your questions about love and relationships to infoasknicci@gmail.com.