Painter Perry Brown's oil on panel landscapes will remind you of something. What that something is depends on your frame of reference.

Painter Perry Brown's oil on panel landscapes will remind you of something. What that something is depends on your frame of reference.

"I constantly hear from collectors that there's such an emotional tone to them," Brown said. "It reminds them of really good times in their lives. It strikes emotional accords. That's what gets people."

New Yorkers love the Central Park scenes of couples walking together. Ohio buyers, he said, are particularly drawn to the paintings with sheep or barns.

"I think it reminds them of their childhood," he said. "The pastoral paintings are very calming and moody."

Brown, who lives in Colorado, shows his paintings at Art Access Gallery in Bexley only once a year. However, he has plenty of memories of the Ohio countryside. He lived in Columbus for nearly a decade and worked as an art director for the clothing brand Hollister.

Even though Brown's paintings often inspire happy or reflective moments for viewers, he said, they are not exactly merry.

"Very rarely do I paint a blue sky," he said. "Sometimes when things are bright and colorful and cheery, the story's not there that you're trying to tell."

Brown employs the tonalist technique of using shadows and light to create mood. Trees are left a bit unfinished. There are allusions to grass, but not a million different blades.

"It's getting a feeling of a scene without unveiling everything in a scene. [The viewers] fill in the rest," Brown said. "When we remember things, we remember bits and pieces."

New to this year's Brown solo exhibition are 8-inch-by-6-inch paintings of cats, dogs and perfume bottles. The series' subjects are posed like regal members of society and bathed in lighting reminiscent of royal Renaissance portraits.

"They're pets that you'd see in New York City, aristocratic pets," Brown said of the seven paintings that will hang together in the exhibition in one long row. "The perfume bottles add tension to the presentation, so it's not just a row of animals. The perfume bottles add character. They're all something you'd find in a New York apartment."

For $350 per portrait, the elite beasts are something you could find in a Columbus apartment, too.