Oilerie Columbus is a franchise of an American company (called Oilerie) that believes no one knows olives like Italy knows olives. Frank Sinatra, whom shoppers will hear crooning from the speakers, would be proud.

Oilerie Columbus is a franchise of an American company (called Oilerie) that believes no one knows olives like Italy knows olives. Frank Sinatra, whom shoppers will hear crooning from the speakers, would be proud.

The new store in the Grandview Center shopping plaza sells inventive varieties of Italian-grown and -produced olive oils and balsamic vinegars. Each olive oil the store carries is first cold pressed, which means that the olives were crushed just once in order to get the best of the fruit's juice.

They sell quality products, said Oilerie Columbus co-owner Nathan Laslow, but what makes the seven Oilerie stores in the U.S. unique is that shoppers can pour and taste the condiments before they make a selection.

Each oil and vinegar is in a stainless steel canister, called a fusti in Italy. Customers pour tiny shots from the fusti spouts of the different blends, such as pear balsamic or cinnamon olive oil (great on sweet potatoes, Laslow said). When they've finished tasting, an Oilerie employee will pour the desired product into the store's signature glass bottle.

That employee will most likely be Laslow.

"I'm here every day," said Laslow, who co-owns the store with his mom, Laura. "I'd rather work 70 hours a week at something I really enjoy than 40 at something I don't."

Laslow, 23, graduated from the College of Wooster in May. He was studying political science when his parents called him in February with the idea of opening an Oilerie in Columbus. After visiting an Oilerie and falling "in love with the concept," Laslow said he knew a job in politics wasn't in his near future.

"Watching my dad, I saw how hard he worked and saw where [owning a franchised store] can lead," said Laslow, whose father owns several Burger King and Donatos locations. "The spirit's been in the family. The education I got at the dinner table certainly helped, and I would like this store to have a family feel."

Olive oils are $15 per 12.7 ounce bottle (the truffle and organic olive oils are a dollar more), and balsamics average $19 per bottle. A bottle of the 25-year aged balsamic, "the star of the show," Laslow said, costs $19.50.

Visitors will also find other food items such as flavored fettuccini, stuffed olives, spices, dried mushrooms, bruschetta spreads and even chocolate-covered almonds that look like olives.

Beauty products made with olive oil are popular - lip gloss ($2.49), body scrubs ($26), lotions ($18), bars of soap ($6) - but the culinary options are champ.

"We encourage people to experiment. The best part is when someone comes in and loves what they taste," Laslow said, "empowering them to cook something in a new way."