Boxy winter coats, characterized by sharp shoulders and cinchless waists and bottoms, are in vogue - and in "Vogue" - again this fall. While stunning on the runway, in real life this trend is disappointing. Boxy winter coats only seem to flatter the figures of women who are as tall and thin as the models in this issue's cover story.

Boxy winter coats, characterized by sharp shoulders and cinchless waists and bottoms, are in vogue - and in "Vogue" - again this fall. While stunning on the runway, in real life this trend is disappointing. Boxy winter coats only seem to flatter the figures of women who are as tall and thin as the models in this issue's cover story.

Perhaps even they couldn't pull it off properly. The boxy coat's so-gawky-it's-graceful architecture best ensconces the arty Bowie types. Unless you are often mistaken for Tilda Swinton and/or Thom Yorke, leave that look on the runway.

Alas, hunting for winter wear that is both stylish and functional can be as frustrating as figuring out whether Swinton and Yorke are the same person (gah, they are so alike!), but there are a lot of interesting winter accessory options with unique takes on old ideas.

A new product called Bootights will hold particular appeal to women who wear boots and skirts throughout the season. The Bootights are thick tights with moisture-wicking socks attached at the calf or ankle. Clever.

Bootights average in the low-$30 range and can be found at Nordstrom or bootights.com, but shoppers can find other unique warm winter wear designed closer to home. Check out Columbus-based Torn Angel (etsy.com/shop/TornAngel) for fashion-forward thick cowl scarves, wool fanned neck warmers and unique wristlet gloves.

Another local line worth checking out is BMC Headwear (bmcheadwear.com). The company's owner and designer is 28-year-old Brian McAlister. A New Albany native, McAlister began crocheting as a college freshman at Ohio Wesleyan. In 2009, he turned his hobby into a business by finding a manufacturer to make his patterns. Now he sells his crocheted gear online and at local shops such as Rowe boutique and Paradise Garage.

"I want to make garments that fit with existing wardrobes," McAlister said of his line's hats, infinity scarves and hooded scarves. "They're very good styling pieces."

Indicative of his form-meets-function aesthetic is a new line of baseball hats in herringbone, houndstooth and other newsboy cap-style patterns. BMC plans to release the line in a couple of months.

The hooded scarves ($49) are my particular BMC favorite. They're warm, the craftsmanship is stellar and their look is very fashionable.

Stylish while still thinking outside the box(y)? Bring it, winter.

Objects of Desire is a bi-weekly column that explores the items Columbus shoppers crave. Follow Jackie Mantey on Twitter at @Jackie_Mantey.